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Please note: This pages is archived for historical purposes and is no longer being maintained or updated.

These are the everyday things you can do to protect yourself (information from www.flu.gov): 

  • Get vaccinated.  To find a flu clinic near you, go to the 2-1-1 Flu Clinic Locator or call 2-1-1.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective.

  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread this way.

  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.

  • Stay home if you are sick until at least 24 hours after you no longer have a fever (100°F or 37.8°C) or signs of a fever (without the use of a fever-reducing medicine, such as Tylenol®).  More information.

  • Follow public health advice regarding school closures, avoiding crowds and other social distancing measures.


Taking care of yourself if you are sick

From www.flu.gov

If you have been diagnosed with H1N1 flu, you should stay home, follow your doctor’s orders, and watch for signs that you need immediate medical attention.

  • CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever (100°F or 37.8°C) is gone except to get medical care or for other things you have to do and no one else can do for you. (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine, such as Tylenol®.) You should stay home from work, school, travel, shopping, social events, and public gatherings.
  • Avoid close contact with others, especially those who might easily get the flu, such as people age 65 years and older, people of any age with chronic medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, or heart disease), pregnant women, young children, and infants.
  • Clean hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub often, especially after using tissues or coughing/sneezing into your hands.
  • Cover coughs and sneezes.
  • Wear a facemask when sharing common spaces with other household members to help prevent spreading the virus to others. This is especially important if other household members are at high risk for complications from influenza. More information. 
  • Drink clear fluids such as water, broth, sports drinks, or electrolyte beverages made for infants to prevent becoming dehydrated.
  • Get plenty of rest.
  • Do not smoke.
  • Get medical attention right away if you:
    • Have difficulty breathing or chest pain
    • Have purple or blue discoloration of your lips
    • Are vomiting and unable to keep liquids down, or
    • Show signs of dehydration, such as feeling dizzy when standing or being unable to urinate

 


Treatment and antivirals

From www.flu.gov

If you do contract the flu, talk to your doctor about antivirals. Antiviral drugs are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaler) that can be used for prevention or treatment of flu viruses. If you get sick, antiviral drugs can make your illness milder and make you feel better faster. Two types of antivirals, Oseltamivir (TAMIFLU®) and Zanamivir  (RELENZA®) may be effective against the H1N1 flu.  More information.


For more information on how to plan for the flu season, click here.