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What do I do if I think I was exposed to coronavirus?

Some people are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19. Here’s what to do if you think you may have been exposed to coronavirus.

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Watch for symptoms

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed COVID-19 cases. These symptoms may appear 2–14 days after exposure.

  • Fever (100.4°F/38°C or higher)
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

If you develop these emergency warning signs for COVID-19, get medical attention immediately.

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

Call before you go icon

Call before you go

Call your doctor or call 2-1-1 if you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing. 

Tell them about your symptoms and your exposure. They will decide whether you need to be tested.

Consult your health care provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

 

MKE Cares - Mask Ordinance |  COVID-19  |  FAQ

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  1. Are masks required in the City of Milwaukee?

Yes. On July 13, 2020, the Milwaukee Common Council adopted an ordinance requiring that all persons wear face coverings in public spaces, indoors and outdoors. The ordinance goes into effect Thursday, July 16, 2020 and will be enforced throughout the duration of the Moving Milwaukee Forward health and safety order. We are currently in phase 4. Please refer to the Order for details specific to each sector (milwaukee.gov/MMFS). This mask policy refers to any person leaving their private dwelling/property to wear a mask at all times, this includes work. 

  2. Is the City of Milwaukee Health Department distributing masks?

The City of Milwaukee Health Department under resolution 200409, approved on July 13, 2020, was directed to establish a program to distribute masks to any City resident that doesn’t have one upon request. The City of Milwaukee Health Department will coordinate purchasing and distribution of free masks for the community. The Health Department will partner with other city entities including but not limited to the Milwaukee Police and Fire Departments, Public Library, and Community Development Block Grant neighborhood service programs for access. Additionally, a comprehensive community mask access plan will be developed by 7/31/2020  by the health department and vetted by the Board of Health.   

  3. Where can I find information on face mask distribution sites:

In addition to the face masks distributed by the City of Milwaukee Health Department, Fiserv Forum serves as the distribution site for 2.5 million non-surgical face masks for MaskUpMKE, a Milwaukee initiative that benefits the medical and nonprofit community during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

  4. Do I need to wear a face covering or mask every time I go outside?
  • Our ordinance requires masks outdoors when 6-foot social distancing cannot be achieved. We also have opted for self-enforcement here, meaning we hope people will use their best judgement to comply outdoors. We encourage our community members to be outside as much as possible even as temperatures fluctuate. We know that the outdoors are great for children and studies show that the virus spreads differently outdoors. 

  • The CDC does give general guidance on mask wearing. We know that the more people who wear masks, the better we are all protected.  

  • Any person 3 years old or older in the city of Milwaukee "shall have possession of a face covering when the person leaves home or other place of residence." 

  • In regards to any person with a disability preventing them from wearing a mask, there is an exemption written into the ordinance. Persons who fall into the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidance for those who should not wear face coverings due to a medical condition, mental health condition, developmental disability, or for whom no other accommodation can be offered under the Americans with Disabilities Act.  

  • Childcare centers can apply for an exemption with the MHD if they can demonstrate strong safety practices. 

  5. Do I need to wear a mask inside if I live in an apartment building (or any location with more than one apartment)?

Everyone over the age of 3 years old who lives in an apartment building or location with more than one apartment should maintain proper physical distancing (also referred to as “social distancing”) in all common spaces by maintaining at least 6 feet between themselves and others. If you are not able to be at least 6 feet from others, then you must wear a mask in these common spaces, which include: 

  • Lobby 

  • Hallways 

  • Elevators 

  • Stairwells 

  • Laundry rooms 

  • Garage or parking lots 

  • Walkways  

  • Yards 

  • Other common outdoor and indoor areas shared by more than one apartment/townhouse when 6 feet of separation cannot reliably and consistently be maintained.  

  6. What if I am unable to wear a mask due to a preexisting health condition or physical or mental disability?

If you are unable to wear a mask due to an underlying health condition, or a physical or mental disability (that prevents you from breathing properly or prohibits you from putting on and taking off your mask properly), please do NOT wear a mask. This includes people who: 

  • Are 2 years old or younger 

  • Have trouble breathing 

  • Are unconscious, incapacitated, or not able to remove the mask without assistance.  

  • If you cannot wear a mask and need or want to go outside or to a place of business, please take important physical distancing precautions: 

    • Maintain a safe separation of at least 6 feet from others while outside, as well as inside any office or other building. 

  • Avoid crowds of any size. 

  • Try to visit grocery stores and pharmacies when they are less crowded 

  • Persons who fall into the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidance for those who should not wear face coverings due to a medical condition, mental health condition, developmental disability, or for whom no other accommodation can be offered under the Americans with Disabilities Act. 

 

  7. How do I properly wear a cloth face covering or mask?
  • All face coverings should:
    • Fit snugly, but comfortably against the side of the face.
    • Be secured with ties or ear loops Include multiple layers of fabric.
    • Allow for breathing without restriction (cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 3, persons who have trouble breathing, or anyone who is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance).
  • Be able to be laundered and machine dried without damage or change to shape.
  • Be frequently washed using a washing machine with detergent and hot water and dried on a hot cycle. They can also be hand washed with soap and warm water, and left to dry.
  • After wearing your face mask, you should remove it carefully, avoiding touching your nose, eyes, or mouth until the face covering has been properly disposed of or placed carefully away to be washed and you should immediately wash your hands after removal.
  8. Should I wear a face mask or covering while I exercise?
  • Yes! Everyone is required to wear a mask, even to exercise. If you are exercising and need to remove your face covering to breathe adequately, make sure no one is near you before removing it. Be sure to keep the face covering readily available so you can put it back on quickly and properly if someone comes within 6 feet of you.
  • It’s also important for you to stay at least 6 feet away from others while you are exercising outside. Only engage in types of exercise that allow you to keep a 6-foot physical distance from others and that don’t require shared equipment or close contact with others.
  • Cloth masks seem to allow people to breathe easier, especially while exercising, as they are more thin than other varieties.
  9. What precautions do I need to take when removing my face mask or covering?
  • Wash your hands for 20 seconds with soap and water every time you put on and take off the face covering. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Do not touch your eyes, nose, or mouth when you remove the face covering.
  • Do not put a used face covering in places where others can touch them or where germs trapped in your face covering can touch other surfaces, such as counter tops or a kitchen table.
  • Do not throw your face covering loose in a bag or backpack. Keep a paper or plastic bag with you to store your face covering if you will be taking it off when outside the house.
  10. How often should I wash my face mask or covering?
  • It is recommended that you wash your face covering once a day by hand or machine using detergent. The face covering should be fully dry before using it again.
  • Disposable “procedure” masks cannot be washed, but may be used in a 5-7-day rotation to allow viral particles to become non-viable on the outer surface of the mask.
  11. My organization wants to help make masks - how do we do that?

MaskUpMKE is an effort to establish one central place for organizations and people in the City of Milwaukee to request handmade cloth face masks that are being sewn by local volunteers. This is a collaboration between many community partners.

See the questions below for how you or your organization can give or get mask(s). Other sewing groups may join. Please email the City of Milwaukee Health Department at ASKMHDCOVID19@milwaukee.gov for more information.

  12. I sew masks - where can I donate them?
  • Log Cabin Sewing Company: We have been called to help! Join the Cause to Protect those that Help by Sewing Fabric Face Masks.
    • We have now created a group of volunteers that are creating approved face masks for vetted local agency needs here in SE Wisconsin.
    • 12520 W Hampton Ave., Butler, WI 53007, US
    • +1 262-202-8765
    • craftyperson@logcabinsewingcompany.com
  • The Masked Sewists for SE Wisconsin - Can be found on Facebook 
  •  MaskUp is an effort to establish one central place for organizations and people in the City of Milwaukee to request handmade cloth face masks that are being sewn by local volunteers. If you or anyone you know would like to sew masks and donate them, please contact ASKMHDCOVID19@milwaukee.gov for assisting in coordinating this effort.
  13. My organization needs masks - how can we get them?
  • If your organization is in need of masks, please submit your request to ASKMHDCOVID19@milwaukee.gov.
  • Someone will be in touch with you directly.
  14. I need a face covering - where can I get one?

Please check with your local pharmacy, grocery store, or other box store.

  15. Is it possible for me to make my own face covering?
  • You can make your face covering easily at home by using a scarf, bandana or other cotton cloth. There are a number of easy “do it yourself” videos and instructions to help you make your own cloth face covering at home, including:
  • The CDC website has a few patterns, including one that involves a coffee filter and another that requires no sewing — just scissors and the willingness to sacrifice a T-shirt! Surgeon General Jerome Adams released a video of himself making a mask out of cloth and rubber bands.
  • A simple no-sew mask that has a bridge for your nose, which can help keep your glasses from fogging up.
  • There are many quiz sites online that may help determining what mask types may work for you such as: https://www.playbuzz.com/larak10/a-who-is-your-mask-and-the-person-behind-it or https://www.quizony.com/what-mask-do-you-wear/index.html Answer a few questions to find an easy, no-sew mask you can make and feel comfortable wearing.
  • Homemade cloth masks can be found online. Look for ones made of cotton. If you order online, places like Etsy, which you can filter by location, allow you to support someone local and get a delivery more quickly.
  • Residents who already have masks and/or the resources at home to make cloth masks are encouraged to defer supplies to those residents and families who are most in need.
  16. Other Local Health Department (LHD) mask order:

Dane County issued emergency order in effect 7/13/20 at 8:00 a.m.

  17. How is the ordinance enforced?
  • The owner or operator of any building open to the public shall ensure all persons present in their building comply with the face covering requirements.
  • The owner or operator of any building open to the public has the right to refuse entry or service to any person for failure to comply.
  • Any owner or operator of a building open to the public that permits a person to violate in their building open to the public shall upon conviction, pay a fine between $50 and not more than $500.
  • The Commissioner of Health and city attorney are authorized to pursue license revocation or a court order closing a building open to the public in accordance with state and local law for failing to require persons present to abide.
  18. Does the mask mandate cover weddings as well?
  • Masks are required at weddings by officiant and guests just like at a restaurant. 
  • Brides and grooms are not required to wear a mask during the ceremony but must maintain six (6) foot distance from the guests and officiant
   19. I was told by a public venue that they will not follow the mandate or enforce it. Are businesses exempt in wearing masks if they choose?
  • Businesses/operators of public venues are not exempt from the mask ordinance.    
  • The owner or operator of any building open to the public shall ensure all persons present in their building comply with the face covering requirements.  
  • The owner or operator of any building open to the public has the right to refuse entry or service to any person for failure to comply.  
  • Any owner or operator of a building open to the public that permits a person to violate in their building open to the public shall upon conviction, pay a fine between $50 and not more than $500.  
  • The Commissioner of Health and city attorney are authorized to pursue license revocation or a court order closing a building open to the public in accordance with state and local law for failing to require persons present to abide. 

 

COVID-19 Frequently Asked Questions

COVID-19 FAQ (PDF)

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  What is COVID-19?

The coronavirus (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness that is spreading in the Milwaukee community. The first cases were found in China and have since spread around the world. The virus is not associated with any particular race, ethnicity, culture or age. Anyone is susceptible to COVID-19.

COVID-19 has a potential to cause severe illness is some people. It is spread through droplets in the air from people coughing or sneezing and can also live on surfaces like cardboard for 24 hours or on plastic for up to 3 days.

  What are the signs and symptoms of COVID-19?

Most people who have COVID-19 have little to no symptoms, but some people do and might have to go to the hospital. Most people who get sick from COVID-19 start to feel these symptoms between two and 14 days after they catch it.

Symptoms may include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Sore throat
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Body or muscle aches
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Loss of smell
  • Loss of taste


Not everyone with COVID-19 has all of these symptoms. For many, symptoms are mild, with no fever. It is important to know that you can still spread (transmit) the virus to others even if you have mild or no symptoms.

  How does COVID-19 spread from person to person?

COVID-19 is spread through droplets in the air from people coughing or sneezing and can also live on surfaces like cardboard for 24 hours or on plastic for up to 3 days.

COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person when people are in close contact with one another. When an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks these droplets can land in mouths, noses, or breathed in by people who are in close contact.

It also may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 from touching a surface or object that has the virus and then touching their own mouth, nose, or eyes.

COVID-19 is very easily to spread between people. CDC has indicated that COVID-19 spreads easier between people than the seasonal flu.

  Can CoVID-19 be caught from a person who has no symptoms?

The main way the disease spreads is through respiratory droplets expelled by someone who is coughing. The risk of catching COVID-19 from someone with no symptoms at all is very low. However, many people with COVID-19 experience only mild symptoms. This is particularly true at the early stages of the disease. It is therefore possible to catch COVID-19 from someone who has, for example, just a mild cough and does not feel ill. The World Health Organization (WHO) is assessing ongoing research on the period of transmission of COVID-19 and will continue to share updated findings.

  What can I do to protect myself and prevent the spread of the disease?

To stop the spread of COVID-19:

  • Staying home with your family
  • Washing hands and surfaces often
  • Keeping six feet or more away from others in public spaces
  • Do not meet in group of any size


Covering your nose and mouth with a mask. This mask can be made from cloth. The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators. Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

You can learn more about the current situation at cdc.gov/coronavirus or by calling 2-1-1.

  Who is at risk of getting COVID-19?

Anyone who is close to someone who is infected with COVID-19 is at risk for catching the virus. The virus is not associated with any particular race, ethnicity, culture or age. Anyone is susceptible to COVID-19. This virus is now spreading person to person in the Milwaukee community.

  How can I prevent getting COVID-19?

There is no vaccine to keep you from catching COVID-19 coronavirus. The best way to keep from catching coronavirus is to: 

  • There is no vaccine to prevent you from getting sick with COVID-19. Do the following to prevent getting COVID-19:
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds after you have been in a public place, after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not easily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Try to not touch your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Practice physical distancing of 6 feet or more from other people. Remember that some people without symptoms may be able to spread the virus.
  • Stay home, save lives to prevent getting or spreading COVID-19 in the Milwaukee community.
  • Always cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve when you cough or sneeze.
  • The CDC is recommending the use of a cloth face covering to keep people who are infected but do not have symptoms from spreading COVID-19 to others. Learn more at 
  • The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators. Medical face masks are critical supplies that should be reserved for healthcare workers and other first responders, as recommended by CDC.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them. Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.
  • Be sure to follow the instructions on the label to ensure safe and effective use of the product. Many products recommend keeping the surface wet for several minutes to ensure germs are killed. Many also recommend precautions such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.
  How do you treat COVID-19?

Most people who have COVID-19 get better just by resting, drinking fluids, and treating the symptoms of COVID-19. There is no vaccine for COVID-19. If you think you may have been infected with COVID-19, contact your health care provider immediately by phone. Follow all the care instructions from your health care provider and local health department. They may give instructions on checking and reporting your symptoms.

Call 911 if you have a medical emergency. If you have a medical emergency and need to call 911, notify the operator that you have or think you might have COVID-19. If possible, put on a face covering before medical arrives.

Emergency warning signs of COVID-19 are:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability arouse
  • Bluish lips or face
  What should you do if you are around someone who has COVID 19?

The symptoms you should look for are:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Sore throat
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Body or muscle aches
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Loss of smell
  • Loss of taste


If you get any of these symptoms within 14 days of being around someone with COVID-19 coronavirus, call your health care provider right away. Tell your provider that you might have had contact with someone with coronavirus and tell them your symptoms.

  I think I may have novel coronavirus (COVID-19). What should I do?

If you are having a medical emergency, please call 911. If you have health concerns that are not a medical emergency, please call your doctor before going in-person to a clinic or hospital. Your doctor will provide you with the next steps you should take over the phone.

If you do not have a doctor, please contact one of these health systems:

  • Froedtert & Medical College of Wisconsin- 414-805-2000
  • Advocate Aurora Health - 1-866-443-2584
  • Ascension Wisconsin - 833-981-0711

You may also visit Children’s Wisconsin 24/7 Online Urgent Care

If you do not have health insurance or you are not connected to a doctor, you may also reach out to one of the five Community Health Centers in Milwaukee:

  • Gerald L. Ignace Indian Health Center – 414-383-9526
  • Milwaukee Health Services, Inc. – 414-372-8080
  • Outreach Community Health Center – 800-952-1086
  • Progressive Community Health Center - 414-882-2040
  • Sixteenth Street Community Health Center – 414-672-1353

FREE Northside Testing Sites

FREE COVID-19 Testing
Open to the public. No Appointment necessary. Walk up or drive up. Monday-Thursday 11am-7pm, Friday-Saturday 11am-5pm (Closed Sunday). UMOS, 2701 S. Chase Ave. and Custer Stadium, 4300 W. Fairmount Ave.

Map of COVID-19 Testing Sites 
Anyone with symptoms should request to be tested. Try your primary care doctor first.

  Who can get tested for COVID-19?

If you have symptoms such as a cough or fever, but do not think you need to go to the doctor, stay home and rest. If you have trouble breathing or an emergency, call 911.

The rules for who is a priority for testing can change often. Please check back here for updates. COVID-19 symptoms may include cough, fever, and shortness of breath. People who work in health care or who are in the hospital will be prioritized for tests. High risk people such as people living in nursing homes or individuals with health problems will also be prioritized.

More information can be found on the Wisconsin Department of Human Services site What to Do If You Are Sick and at the CDC Priorities for Testing Patients with Suspected COVID-19 Infection

Additional testing information for Wisconsin can be found on the Wisconsin Department of Health Services COVID-19: Health Care Providers webpage under testing criteria. 

FREE Northside Testing Sites

FREE COVID-19 Testing
Open to the public. No Appointment necessary. Walk up or drive up. Monday-Thursday 11am-7pm, Friday-Saturday 11am-5pm (Closed Sunday). UMOS, 2701 S. Chase Ave. and Custer Stadium, 4300 W. Fairmount Ave.

Map of COVID-19 Testing Sites 
Anyone with symptoms should request to be tested. Try your primary care doctor first.

  I received a COVID-19 test and am waiting for my test results. What should I do now?

Follow the directions given to you by your doctor.

While waiting for your test results, stay home and stay away from other people including family and roommates living in your home. Stay in a separate room from your family members if possible. Drink plenty of water and rest while staying home.

Monitor your symptoms. If your symptoms get worse, such as shortness of breath, a worse cough, or fever (fever is over 101 for more than 3 days or your fever is over 100.4 for more than 5 days), call your doctor. If you experience a medical emergency, call 911.

Wear a cloth face covering over your nose and mouth if you need to be around others. For more information on creating a homemade cloth face covering, please view the CDC resource on the use of cloth face coverings

  I am traveling or just returned from a trip. What should I do?

Travel guidelines are changing rapidly. For the most up-to-date information, visit the Wisconsin Department of Health Services' website

  What does isolation and quarantine mean?

Isolation and quarantine are two actions that can be taken by Public Health Agencies to help protect the public by preventing and containing the spread of a contagious disease. The goal is to stop more people from becoming infected. Isolation separates sick people who are known to have an illness or disease from people who are not sick. Quarantine separates and restricts the movement of people who have been exposed to an illness or disease while they are being monitored to determine whether they become sick. For COVID-19, the incubation period is a maximum of 14 days, therefore this is the time period that is used to determine the length of quarantine.

When Public Health Agencies takes the action of isolating or quarantining, then everyone involved may become part of the legal process. Wisconsin Statutes Chapter 252 Communicable Diseases, specifically § 252.06, authorizes the use of isolation and/or quarantine to stop the spread of a communicable disease.

  What should patients do if they are quarantined?

While quarantined, the patient:

  • May not leave their home or place of containment without prior approval by the health officer or their legal designee
  • May not have contact with any new non-previously exposed people unless approved by the health officer
  • Must be under medical supervision for monitoring, diagnostic testing and collection of blood and other samples
  • May not remove or deface any warnings or placards posted by the health department
  • Has the right to confer with legal counsel

 

Monitoring: 
14 days after the last possible exposure/return from a level 3 area, the patient must:

  • Take their temperature two-times daily; and (report above ~100.4 degrees Fahrenheit )
  • Watch for COVID-2019 symptoms (fever, cough, shortness of breath); and
  • On a daily basis permit a public health official to directly observe one or both of the temperature checks and review symptoms; and,
  • Immediately report to public health officials if they have any symptoms; and,
  • Discuss with public health officials their plans for activities so they can determine whether these are allowed.

 

Movement:

  • Quarantined patients should not travel by any commercial conveyances (e.g., airplane, ship, long-distance bus, or train). Local use of public transportation (e.g., taxi, bus, subway) and travel should be discussed and coordinated with the public health department. If local public transportation is used, the patient must be able to exit quickly if they feel ill. Travel by private car is permitted.
  • Do not go to bars, restaurants, shopping centers, theaters, church, or any public places where they will be sitting or standing less than 6 feet away from others.
  • Do not go to their workplace (telework is permitted).
  • Do not go to school (which is currently closed).
  • Additional movement restrictions may be defined by your health department depending on circumstances (e.g. healthcare provider, first responders).
  What is the guidance for emergency workers (MFD, MPD, EMS)?

Travel is not in the equation any longer for this group. If the individual came in contact (within 6 feet of the person) with a known case (someone who tested positive) for more than 10 minutes, they are required to self-quarantine and monitor for symptoms. Monitoring for symptoms means reporting immediately if the client has one or more of the following:

  • Fever (100.4 or higher) **must take temperature two-times daily
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  Will I be evicted if I can’t afford my rent?

No, not at this time. Governor Evers had banned evictions and foreclosures in the state of Wisconsin for 60 days starting Friday March 27, 2020. Evictions are still allowed in domestic violence cases or when someone may face physical harm. This order does not include individuals on month-to-month leases.

  Will my utilities be shut off if I can’t afford to pay them?

No, not at this time. Governor Tony Evers of Wisconsin has issued Emergency Order #11 which states that public utilities will waive late feeds and temporarily suspend utility disconnections (unless needed for safety). More information can be found in Emergency Order #11

  Can I have sex? Here are some tips.

Know how COVID-19 spreads.

  • You can get COVID-19 from a person who has it.
    • The virus can spread to people who are within about 6 feet of a person with COVID-19 when that person coughs or sneezes.
    • The virus can spread through direct contact with their saliva or mucus.
  • We still have a lot to learn about COVID-19 and sex.
    • COVID-19 has been found in feces of people who are infected with the virus.
    • COVID-19 has not yet been found in semen or vaginal fluid.
    • We know that other coronaviruses do not efficiently transmit through sex.

 

Have sex with people close to you.

  • You are your safest sex partner. Masturbation will not spread COVID-19, especially if you wash your hands (and any sex toys) with soap and water for at least 20 seconds before and after sex.
  • The next safest partner is someone you live with. Having close contact — including sex — with only a small circle of people helps prevent spreading COVID-19. Have sex only with consenting partners.
  • You should avoid close contact — including sex — with anyone outside your household.
  • If you do have sex with others, have as few partners as possible.
  • If you usually meet your sex partners online or make a living by having sex, consider taking a break from in-person dates. Video dates, sexting or chat rooms may be options for you.

 

Take care during sex.

  • Kissing can easily pass COVID-19. Avoid kissing anyone who is not part of your small circle of close contacts.
  • Rimming (mouth on anus) might spread COVID-19. Virus in feces may enter your mouth.
  • Condoms and dental dams can reduce contact with saliva or feces, especially during oral or anal sex.
  • Washing up before and after sex is more important than ever.
    • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
    • Wash sex toys with soap and warm water.
    • Disinfect keyboards and touch screens that you share with others
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