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WEALTH IN MILWAUKEE

Milwaukee is consistently ranked as an excellent city in which to live and do business.

Milwaukee has a strong market for retail business. Per capita personal income in metro Milwaukee, which totals $34.8 billion, is about 10 percent higher than regional and national averages.

Comparing the City of Milwaukee's density to that of surrounding suburbs, Milwaukee has one of the highest densities and has higher aggregate income than these surrounding suburbs.  

Community Population 2000 Housing Units
 2000
Density
(persons per
 sq  mi)
2000
Aggregate
Income
1999
Income
per
Square
Mile
 1999
Brookfield 38,649 14,208 1,417 $1,441,298,508 $52,856,850
Cudahy 18,249 7,888 3,842 $361,484,835 $76,108,688
Franklin 29,494 10,602 850 $810,318,156 $23,339,416
Glendale 13,367 5,772 2,232 $405,394,376 $67,684,968
Greendale 14,405 6,011 2,569 $408,569,015 $72,865,264
Greenfield 35,476 15,697 3,071 $842,732,380 $72,950,427
Menomonee Falls 32,647 12,844 981 $896,290,738 $26,929,582
Mequon 21,823 7,861 466 $1,054,771,059 $22,529,299
New Berlin 38,220 14,495 1,035 $1,138,535,580 $30,834,822
Oak Creek 28,456 11,239 994 $671,163,216 $23,445,715
Shorewood 13,783 6,539 8,612 $453,490,850 $283,354,921
Waukesha 64,825 25,663 2,990 $809,402,650 $37,338,218
Wauwatosa 47,271 20,388 3,570 $1,363,012,014 $102,925,172
West Allis 61,254 27,604 5,387 $1,281,066,156 $112,658,479
Whitefish Bay 14,163 5,457 6,611 $560,982,267 $261,848,214
Milwaukee 596,974 232,188 6,167 $9,659,636,294 $99,786,817

Source: 2000 Census

Analyzing total income per square mile adjusts for the variation in land sizes between municipalities. When comparing gross income per square mile, the City of Milwaukee exceeds suburbs such as Brookfield and Mequon by more than $40 million per square mile.

Milwaukee has long been a center of commerce and industry in the Great Lakes region. In recent years, job creation has pushed local employment levels to historic highs. Between 1983 and 2000, Milwaukee employers added more than 240,000 jobs, making its economy one of the strongest in the country. As a result of the continued job growth, unemployment levels have remained near or below 5% since 1992. The unemployment rate for 2001 was 5.4%. The three sectors that comprise most of Milwaukee’s economy and workforce are service sector industries, manufacturing, and retail trade. Service sector industries employ 32.5% of Milwaukee’s workforce. Manufacturing employs 20.2% of the workforce, and produces $31 billion in product annually. Thirdly, the retail sales sector employs 15.7% of the workforce, and earned $19.4 billion in retail sales.

In addition to industrious workers and conservative business practices, Milwaukee receives the added economic stimulus of tourism. More than 5 million tourists generated $2.2 billion at area attractions such as festivals, parades, and the nationally recognized zoo and museum. This is up 17.5% from 1999 due in part to the newly constructed Miller Park baseball stadium, the Midwest Express Center, a $120 million addition to the Potawatomi Bingo Casino complex, and a $100 million addition to the Milwaukee Art Museum.